I News

Patois, Steelpan, East Indian, African and First People rhythms … All these and more are part of the play ‘Harmony in Diversity’, written and directed by Eintou Springer. The play was originally showcased in St. Kitts & Nevis in 2000 as this country’s presentation for Carifesta. In 2018, Idakeda is reviving the play to share with the national public and across the tourism industry.

Click the link for photos from rehearsals:

https://www.facebook.com/pg/indigenouscreativeartsnetwork/photos

As we seek new ways to energise other industries to lessen our dependence on the energy sector, Harmony in Diversity presents us with an opportunity to showcase wholesome entertainment for the entire family, while celebrating our complex mix of cultures and heritage.

Keep checking this space for information about where you will be able to see performances of Harmony in Diversity!


Contact Idakeda directly to book Interventions or Workshops for your organisation, school or community or to purchase our educational videos, books and DVDs. Your contributions go towards our community programmes, cultural events and the work of our NGO, ICAN – the Indigenous Creative Arts Network.

Thank you for your support and stay with us on our journey

‘Survivor – A Collection of Plays for Children and Young Adults’ by Eintou Pearl Springer, has been approved for inclusion on the school curriculum by the Ministry of Education. The book is a compilation of her theatrical productions, poetry and original works and is now available to teachers and students of Theatre Arts for teaching purposes and performance.

Click here for article from the launch of Survivor at NALIS Port of Spain

‘Survivor’ is available at Paper Based book store, Hotel Normandie; Metropolitan Book Store, Port of Spain, Blue Edition book store in Tunapuna and from Ms Springer. In the UK, Survivor is available through Peepal Tree Press and in Barbados, from the UWI Bookstore.

Contact us now for your copy and keep checking this space for more news about Survivor!

 


Contact Idakeda directly to book Interventions or Workshops for your organisation, school or community or to purchase our educational videos, books and DVDs. Your contributions go towards our community programmes, cultural events and the work of our NGO, ICAN – the Indigenous Creative Arts Network.

Thank you for your support and stay with us on our journey

Stilt walking, painting and wire-bending are just some of the exciting activities on offer at the Zanté! Carnival and Theatre Arts vacation camp this year. The camp, a project of the non-profit arm of Idakeda – ICAN, the Indigenous Creative Arts Network – boasts a new location and new activities. Additionally, the camp will run for three weeks instead of two, and will be held at #63 Carlos St., Woodbrook, from August 6th -25th.

The main objective of the camp is to ensure the long-term survival of the traditional Carnival Arts of T&T by teaching about Carnival Arts, traditional Carnival Characters and indigenous folk forms. The camp encourages the participation of vulnerable youth, so members of the public are encouraged to sponsor the attendance of a young person in need.

Click here to enjoy photos from Zanté! 2017

The Zanté camp caters for children ages 6-12 years old. The cost is TT400 per week, per child; two or more children TT350 per child. For further details and to register please contact 753-0798, visit our website or like our Facebook, Indigenous Creative Arts Network.

 


Contact Idakeda directly to book Interventions or Workshops for your organisation, school or community or to purchase our educational videos, books and DVDs. Your contributions go towards our community programmes, cultural events and the work of our NGO, ICAN – the Indigenous Creative Arts Network.

Thank you for your support and stay with us on our journey

‘The Art and Practice of the Story’ is the name of the programme that will be taught by Eintou Pearl Springer as one of the mentors in the ‘Mentoring by the Masters’ series, an initiative of the Ministry of Community Development, Culture and the Arts. Every year, the ministry selects a number of veterans in the field of culture, the arts and heritage to impart their knowledge to citizens.

Other mentors in the 2018 edition of the programme include Wendell Manwarren, Meiling, Felix Edinborough and Dr. Suzanne Burke.

Click here to go to the Mentoring by the Masters site

Eintou’s programme will revolve around the story of Ogun, the Orisa God of war, but also, intriguingly of creativity, metal and wealth. This story, during the course of the project, will be transposed into a play to be presented as a performance piece.

Participants will also be exposed to stories from three sectors of our multi-faceted society – First Peoples, Africans and Indians. Additionally, there will be a focus on storytelling and resistance; the case of Anansi will be explored.

Keep checking this space for photos and updates as we explore ‘The Art and Practice of the Story’ with Eintou!

 


Contact Idakeda directly to book Interventions or Workshops for your organisation, school or community or to purchase our educational videos, books and DVDs. Your contributions go towards our community programmes, cultural events and the work of our NGO, ICAN – the Indigenous Creative Arts Network.

Thank you for your support and stay with us on our journey

The Indigenous Creative Arts Network is very pleased to announce that Mrs Sharon Rowley, attorney and wife of the Prime Minister of Trinidad and Tobago, Dr Keith Rowley, has graciously consented to be the patron of the rerun of the award winning production ‘Shades of I- She: Every Woman’s Story’. The play will take place at the Big Black Box in Woodbrook, from May 27th– 29th, with a Gala on May 27th.

The production, scripted and directed by Eintou Pearl Springer, deals with the burning social issues of abortion, rape, incest, child prostitution, HIV Aids, and intimate partner violence. Headline performers are Caribbean Queen of song, Mavis John, Trinidad and Tobago’s great lady of theatre, Eunice Alleyne and Eintou Springer, herself an award winning actress.

The play will once again put the focus on domestic violence, incest and other social traumas when it takes to the stage in May of this year. The aim of the production is to generate useful discussion and solutions through culture and the arts, and to empower women by seeing the stories of other women being portrayed on stage.

‘Shades of I-She’ was originally performed between 1995 – 2002 throughout secondary schools and communities in Trinidad and Tobago, as well as across the Caribbean and internationally. It won a Cacique award for Best Original Music under Musical Director Ewart Serrant. Serrant will return as Musical Director for this run of the play, ably complimented by guitarist Marva Newton Master Drummer Xavier Phillip, thirteen year old pannist Kayode Charles and nine year old drummer Iremide Charles. Also on stage are newcomers, Khailah Bernard, Kiah Mulrain and Shanya Springer. Dara E. Healy, ICAN founder, is the choreographer for the piece and will also be on stage as a dancer and actress.

The three-night run will launch a series of outreach activities with activists in communities across Trinidad and Tobago. Proceeds from the play will go towards funding these interventions and other activities of ICAN. Tickets are available from the Big Black Box, Cher Mere Day Spa outlets at Cipriani Boulevard, Long Circular Mall and Trinicity Mall and from the cast, board and members of ICAN. Visit the ICAN Facebook page for more information or call 461-8637 or 794-4547.

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Contact us to book training sessions and cultural programmes for your organisation, school or community. Support our work by purchasing our t-shirts, books and other cultural products. Like our Facebook page or follow us on Twitter and Instagram!

Thank you for your support & stay with us on our journey …

 

 

Stay in touch with ‘Shades of I-She’ online. Enjoy behind-the-scenes sneak peeks from rehearsals, photos and more on the ICAN Facebook page, Instagram and Twitter as we work towards our May performances.

The Eintou Springer play ‘Shades of I-She: Every Woman’s Story’ will take place at the Big Black Box in Woodbrook, from May 27th- 29th, with a Gala on May 27th. It will once again put the focus on domestic violence, incest and other social traumas. The aim of the production is to generate useful discussion and solutions through culture and the arts, and to raise funds for the community outreach programmes of ICAN.

The play was originally performed between 1995 – 2002 throughout secondary schools and communities in Trinidad and Tobago, as well as across the Caribbean and internationally. It won a Cacique award for Best Original Music under Musical Director Ewart Serrant.

Check out photos from previous performances of ‘Shades of I-She’

In 2016, the play will feature veteran actress Eunice Alleyne, Caribbean songstress Mavis John and the playwright herself, Eintou Springer. Serrant will return as Musical Director for this run of the play, ably complimented by flautist Muhammad Muwakil, thirteen year old pannist and guitarist Kayode Charles and Master Drummer Xavier Phillip. Newcomers Khailah Bernard, Kiah Mulrain and Shanya Springer join the cast. Dara E. Healy, ICAN founder, is the choreographer for the piece and will also be on stage as a dancer and actress.

Tickets are available from the Big Black Box, Cher Mere Day Spa outlets at Cipriani Boulevard, Long Circular Mall and Trinicity Mall and from the cast, board and members of ICAN.

Download and share the Shades of I-She flyer

‘Shades of I-She’ explores the challenges, joys, and triumphs of women everywhere – Join our conversation!

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Contact us to book training sessions and cultural programmes for your organisation, school or community. Support our work by purchasing our t-shirts, books and other cultural products. Like our Facebook page or follow us on Twitter and Instagram to find out what we’re doing.

Thank you for your support & stay with us on our journey …

The Eintou Springer play ‘Shades of I-She: Every Woman’s Story’ will once again put the focus on domestic violence, incest and other social traumas when it takes to the stage in May of this year. The aim of the production is to generate useful discussion and solutions through culture and the arts, and to raise funds for the community outreach programmes of ICAN. The play will take place at the Big Black Box in Woodbrook, from May 27th– 29th, with a Gala on May 27th.

‘Shades of I-She’ explores the challenges, joys, and triumphs of women everywhere. The play will feature veteran actress Eunice Alleyne, Caribbean songstress Mavis John, newcomers Khailah Bernard, Kiah Mulrain and Shanya Springer, and the playwright herself, Eintou Springer. Dara E. Healy, ICAN founder, is the choreographer for the piece and will also be on stage as a dancer and actress.

In response to increased reports of child abuse, domestic violence and trauma being experienced in our communities, it was decided to remount the play in the same month in which mothers are internationally celebrated. Based on the poetry of Eintou Springer, the poems deal with the difficult topics of incest, domestic violence, rape, child prostitution and HIV Aids.

The play was originally performed between 1995 – 2002 throughout secondary schools and communities in Trinidad and Tobago, as well as across the Caribbean and internationally. It won a Cacique award for Best Original Music under Musical Director Ewart Serrant. Serrant will return as Musical Director for this run of the play, ably complimented by flautist Muhammad Muwakil, thirteen year old pannist and guitarist Kayode Charles and Master Drummer Xavier Phillip.

The three-night run will also launch a series of outreach activities with activists in communities across Trinidad and Tobago. Proceeds from the play will go towards funding these interventions and other activities of ICAN, in particular finding a permanent space for its operations.

Tickets are available from the Big Black Box, Cher Mere Day Spa outlets at Cipriani Boulevard, Long Circular Mall and Trinicity Mall and from the cast, board and members of ICAN.

Check out photos from previous performances of ‘Shades of I-She’

=======

Contact us to book training sessions and cultural programmes for your organisation, school or community. Support our work by purchasing our t-shirts, books and other cultural products. Like our Facebook page or follow us on Twitter and Instagram to find out what we’re doing.

Thank you for your support & stay with us on our journey …

By 1881, the people of the barrack yards had had enough. They made the decision to fight for the right to practice their carnival rituals or die defending their culture. Perhaps for the first time in the history of the stick-fighting tradition, the various stick groups notorious for their territorial fights put aside their differences to defeat the plan by the police chief Captain Baker to stop the Carnival.

Evidence suggests that the re-enactment of the Canboulay or ‘Cannes Brulees’, French for burning cane, took place even before full Emancipation in 1838. It is not unreasonable to conclude that the Africans themselves set the fires; as such, the celebration of the burning of the canes would have been their way of laughing at the losses of the plantation owners.

From 1797 Trinidad came under the control of the British. They enriched themselves through sugar production. Indeed, British businessmen so dominated the industry that the French upper-classes eventually moved into successful cocoa production on lands that they purchased (conned) out of Venezuelan labourers who migrated to Trinidad in the early 1800s because of political and social turmoil on mainland South America.

The point is, at the time of the 1881 riots, the separation of the classes by virtue of wealth, possession of land and education was extremely wide. While the élites prospered, the masses of the population, including the stick men, stick women and ordinary people of the barrack yards struggled to survive. It was the same with the rural populations who depended on agriculture. Researchers make the point that the violence within the Carnival was therefore an outward manifestation of frustration about living conditions in the face of the opulence of those who were in charge of the society.

The élites and the media worked tirelessly to discredit and trivialise the carnival of the “lower order of the population”. Undeniably, the complaints by the wealthy fuelled increasingly offensive behaviour by masqueraders. This in turn emboldened the colonial administration to enact laws that targeted Africans cultural practices. Professor Liverpool notes that as early as 1797 Africans were required to obtain permits to dance. By 1832, ringing bells, blowing horns and shells and “practising obeah” were listed as offences. By 1835, masking and beating drums were banned. In 1877, Captain Baker became Inspector Commandant of the Police Force. Repressive measures intensified under his rule, culminating in 1880 when the Cannes Brulees procession was stopped and torches and bois taken away from the masqueraders.

In 1881, the leaders of the Stickfight bands, “the Bakers, Maribones and Diamaitres” formulated a unified strategy, while the community lined up stones, bottles and whatever they could find. Professor Liverpool vividly recounts how at midnight the people moved into the streets to the sound of drums, conch shells and Kalinda chants, carrying their torches and armed with their Bois, led by the fearless stickman Joe Talmana. The ensuing riots saw the victory of the ordinary people over the colonial administration and the saving of the Carnival of Trinidad and Tobago.

The Eintou Springer play that documents these historic events uses the Kikongo word for procession, ‘Kambule’. This street theatre that happens every Carnival Friday morning is unique to our Carnival celebration, but what has not changed is the battle to tell the story. Today, there are still élites in society and the media who would prefer that such “vulgar celebrations of criminal behaviour” were removed from the Festival. Fortunately, the spirits of stickfight ancestors still hover. Undoubtedly, as in 1881, any attempts to repress this history will once again be dealt with by the people without mercy, santimanitay.

Thank you for your support and please stay with us on our journey …

June 20, 2018
Kahaanis and kathas... Storytelling with Masters Eintou Pearl Springer and Raviji

Kahaanis and kathas… Storytelling with Masters Eintou Pearl Springer and Raviji

May 14, 2018

Harmony in Diversity – A Celebration of T&T!

May 14, 2018

Eintou Springer’s ‘Survivor’ Approved For Use In Schools

May 11, 2018

New Location, More Activites for Zante! Vacation Camp In 2018

May 4, 2018

Eintou Pearl Springer Recognised as a ‘Master’

May 16, 2016

‘Shades of I-She’ now under the Patronage of Mrs Sharon Rowley

The Indigenous Creative Arts Network is very pleased to announce that Mrs Sharon Rowley attorney and wife of the Prime Minister of Trinidad and Tobago Dr Keith Rowley has graciously consented to be the patron of the rerun of the award winning production Shades of I She Every Womans Story The play will take place at the Big Black Box in Woodbrook from May 27th 29th with a Gala on May 27th

April 25, 2016

# EveryWoman’sStory – Connect with ‘Shades of I-She’ online

Stay in touch with the Shades of IShe online Enjoy behindthescenes sneak peeks from rehearsals photos and more on the ICAN Facebook page Instagram and Twitter as we work towards our May performances

April 11, 2016

Award winning play ‘Shades of I-She’ puts focus on domestic abuse again

The Eintou Springer play Shades of IShe Every Womans Story will once again put the focus on domestic violence incest and other social traumas when it takes to the stage in May of this year The aim of the production is to generate useful discussion and solutions through culture and the arts and to raise funds for the community outreach programmes of ICAN The play will take place at the Big Black Box in Woodbrook from May 27th 29th with a Gala on May 27th

February 1, 2016

No Bois Man no fraid!

By 1881 the people of the barrack yards had had enough They made the decision to fight for the right to practice their carnival rituals or die defending their culture Perhaps for the first time in the history of the stickfighting tradition the various stick groups notorious for their territorial fights put aside their differences to defeat the plan by the police chief Captain Baker to stop the Carnival

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